User login

Blogs

10

Aug

2015

Made a video demonstrating BSOD with the current University capture point. The final cut can be seen at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kJlDY0XvbA4

Alistair King got in touch and requested that libwandio be separated from libtrace so that he can release projects that use libwandio without having libtrace as a dependency as well. With his help, this was pretty straightforward so now libwandio has a separate download page on the WAND website.

Continued my investigation into optimal Plateau detector parameters. Used my web-app to classify ~230 new events in a morning (less than 5 of which qualified as significant) and merged those results back into my original ground truth. Re-ran the analysis comparing the results for each parameter configuration against the updated ground truth. I've now got an "optimal" set of parameters, although the optimal parameters still only achieve 55% precision and 60% recall.

Poked around at some more unknown flows while waiting for the Plateau analysis to run. Managed to identify some new BitTorrent and eMule clients and also added two new protocols: BDMP and Trion games.

07

Aug

2015

This week wasn't too productive for my honours as far as progress goes, spent most of my time dealing with other papers.

I have gotten around to fixing my test environment, and that is sort of working. I'm running into an issue where freeradius won't send packets back out after making a reply. I initially thought this was to do with it trying to be clever and sending replies base on client-hardware-address instead of the source MAC (which I'm rewriting), but it's not, instead, no packets are leaving the VM. I'll address that early next week.

Coming back to the MAC rewriting, that is working properly now after ironing a couple of mistakes I made in my code I found during testing.

Still need to design a way of getting client traffic to the router in it's own VLAN pair (for segregation), and then back again. The latter is the trickier part, I think.

06

Aug

2015

This week I focused on my presentation, and then secure provisioning.

The presentation feedback so far can be grouped into two categories:

* Relying too much on domain knowledge:
- MAC, PHY, CSMA
- Heavily technical explainations of 802.11i RSNA (perticularly the key derivation)
- Too many acronyms!

* Not covering the problem and my own solution enough
- The jump from IoT to IEEE 802.15.4 was too abrupt
- What about Wi-Fi and Bluetooth?
- How much work have I actually done?
- Does it work?
- Nobody else has creating an open source implementation that uses beacons. This is important!

Andreas helped me out hugely by sitting down with me to refactor my slides. We came up with something very quickly for the next day's presentation that was much better than the first. I still have some more feedback I need to fold in before Wednesday next week.

I also spent some time trying to get a demo going. I want to demonstrate what is possible with a convenient provisioning process. I've written an Android app that will scan QR codes and pull a MAC address and PSK from it. I have also added Bluetooth Smart (BLE) to my coordinator application to accept BLE connections. The aim being to transfer the MAC and PSK to the coordinator (which can then push the PSK into the security supplicant).

tl;dr. Scan QR code on network node with Android. Bluetooth used to transfer PSK to coordinator. New device can then associate and authenticate with coordinator. Profit.

06

Aug

2015

Converted the DNS, TCPPing, traceroute and throughput tests to report
data using protocol buffers, and updated the scripts used by nntsc to
extract/parse the report messages. Updated the build system to
automatically build all the appropriate files from the .proto definition
files.

Wrote some unit tests to make sure that the data being put into the
protocol buffers was the same as the data coming out and that optional
fields were appropriately present/absent.

Started collecting some more data on slow HTTP tests, dumping full
result data to try to see if there are any patterns around what objects
are slow to fetch, and which part of the transfer process is slow.

04

Aug

2015

This week I continued work on oflops, primarily I spent the time on getting TLS working. Creating certificates was a relatively painless part, particularly after Brad explained that we were creating a CA switches and another for controllers. This allows switches to talk controllers, but no switches to talk to other switches or controllers to other controllers.

Once this was working I was hitting a deadlock all the time, this turned out to be a bug in libevent which is fixed in the next release, so I switched to using 2.1.5 beta. With some small modifications to libfluid this appears to be working correctly now.

This week I also got Vandervecken deployed on the WAND production SDN network - with Brad's help of course. The initial attempt on Wednesday failed due to the timing issues on start up - which I was aware of but did not expect to be a problem. I fixed these by adding some caching to delay some rules until they could be installed. On Friday we successfully deployed this however with broken IPv6. This IPv6 issue is due to a hardware bug, for now we are fastpathing all IPv6 traffic which is working well.

I was hoping to be ready to test this week with oflops. However invested a lot of time in RouteFlow/Vandervecken instead. As such I will be spending next week writing my oflops tests and then after that hopefully should be able to move onto preparing my full proposal.

03

Aug

2015

Given the lack of support for Netflow v9 and IPFIX, I have decided to make my application compatible with Netflow v5, v9 and IPFIX. To do this, I simply check the database for MAC addresses. If there are none, then I resort to using source IP addresses to differentiate between MAC addresses. As a result, the device-specific info is not as accurate compared to using MAC addresses. Concerning the user interface, I am gradually adding new features week by week.

03

Aug

2015

I received feedback on two chapters and made changes based on this. The chapters were data collection and load balancer prevalence in the Internet.

03

Aug

2015

Continued digging into the unknown traffic in the day-long Waikato trace I captured last week. Diminishing returns are starting to really kick in now, but I've still managed to add another 9 new protocols (including SPDY) and improved the rules for a further 8.

Worked on a series of scripts to process the results of running the Plateau detector using a variety of different possible configurations (e.g. history and trigger buffer sizes, sensitivity thresholds etc). The aim is to find the optimal set of parameters based on the ground truth we already have. Of course, some parameter combinations are going to produce events that we have never seen before so I've also had to write code to find these events and generate suitable graphs so I can use my web-app to quickly manually classify them appropriately.

Spent a fair bit of time helping Yindong with his experiments.

31

Jul

2015

Now that I have something that works with Q-in-Q, I've progressed on a couple of security considerations I've had in relation to MAC spoofing and keeping my L2 segregated.

I have functionality where the source MAC that gets handed to the RADIUS server is set by my controller, and maps back to an S/CVID mapping. When the traffic comes back, the original MAC is restored so the client doesn't get confused.

I am also considering having this same functionality with traffic going to a router.

I also need to figure out whether I will be passing both VLANs to the router, or none, or one, and how I will get VLANs back into the Handover Port.

Also fixed a "bug" where I didn't send packet_in's back out, so that's back in the code.

31

Jul

2015

Have stopped work on the project, and am instead working on my seminar. I have one at Virscient on Tuesday, one in class on Wednesday, one at WAND the following week and then the final seminar the week after that.

Before I present, I really need to get some actual evaluation data. My title, "Creating a secure and low power internet of things platform", suggests I'm concerned with security and low power. I've got the security (I followed standards including RSNA, so it's at good as 802.11 assuming I implemented it correctly). For the low power, I'm not going to have time to implement serious power savings before my presentations (maybe I will before the final one, who knows). My goal here instead is to waggle GPIO pins to tell me which state the CPU is in, and then use the datasheet values to calculate energy assuming I add power savings.

At the same time, this profiling will tell me where most of the power isused nd where to focus my power saving efforts!

I've been sick the past week, so aside from the presentation I haven't been able to do this profiling. Maybe later today.